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NGC 6383 (14,551 of 18,816)

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NGC 6383

NGC 6383, Cl Collinder 335, ESO 393-7, C 1731-325, Cl VDBH 232, Ocl 1026.0, COCD 402, h 3689, GC 4306

RA: 17h 34m 48s
Dec: −32° 34′ 0″

Con: Scorpius
Ch: MSA:1416, U2:376, SA:22

Ref: SIMBAD, Collinder (1931), DAML02, Archinal&Hynes (2003)

(reference key)

Type: open cluster, 23mn

Mag: B=5.56, V=5.5

Size: 20′
PA: ?

History and Accurate Positions for the NGC/IC Objects (Corwin 2004)

NGC 6383 = NGC 6374, which see.

Remarks

This scattered open cluster lies just over a degree WSW of M6. The brightest star is the unequal double star h4962, component magnitudes 5.5 and 10.5 and separation 5.5"

Historical observations

John Herschel (1847) Cape Observations

Discovered by Sir John Herschel at the Cape of Good Hope with an 18-inch f/13 speculum telescope. He recorded it as "a star 7th mag witha cluster of stars 12m assembled about it. the great star occupies the centre. A very remarkable object." On a second occassion he called it "A curious cluster consisting of one large star 6-7m and some 15 or 20 small ones 13m clustering close around it."

Published comments

Bailey, S.I. (1913)

Bailey, examining a Bruce plate (Harvard Annals, Vol 72, No 2), describes it as "Milky Way, coarse cluster, involving HR 6535, mag 5.71."

Trumpler, R.J. (1928)

(Lick Obs Bul, Vol 14, No. 420) gives the diameter as 5.5' and the class as 2 3 p.

Sulentic & Tifft (1973)

The RNGC (Sulentic and Tifft 1973) notes that this is a 5.5 mag open cluster.

Modern observations

Steve Coe

Coe, observing with a 17.5" f/4.5 at 100X, notes: "Pretty bright, pretty large, irregular, 18 stars counted at 100X. The cluster surrounds the double star h 4962, it is split at 100X with white and blue colors.

Hartung, E.J. (1968) Astron.Obj.South.Tel

Hartung describes the cluster as follows: "A bright yellow star with two faint companions [h4962] lies in a small star cluster about 3' across, the whole bearing a striking resemblance to 30 CMa in NGC 2362, but neither so vivid nor so rich. The field is fine and both of the companions are visible with four-inch telescope."

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