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NGC 7380 (17,394 of 18,816)

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NGC 7380

NGC 7380, Ced 206, Cl Collinder 452, C 2245+578, LBN 511, Ocl 244, COCD 508, VIII 77, h 2182, GC 4842

RA: 22h 47m 6s
Dec: +58° 07′ 0″

Con: Cepheus
Ch: MSA:1071, U2:58, SA:3

Ref: SIMBAD, Collinder (1931), DAML02, Archinal&Hynes (2003)

(reference key)

Type: open cluster, 32mn

Mag: B=7.62, V=7.2

Size: 20′
PA: ?

Remarks

Discovered by Caroline Herschel.

Historical observations

William Herschel (c.1784)

Synonyms: H VIII-077

Observed in 1788 by William Herschel with an 18.7-inch f/13 speculum telescope. He called it "a cluster of coarsely scattered stars, 8' diameter. Discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787."

NGC/IC Dreyer (1888, 1895, 1908)

Described as "cluster of stars, pretty large, pretty rich, slightly compressed, stars 9..13th mag."

Published comments

Trumpler, R.J. (1928)

Trumpler (Lick Obs Bul, Vol 14, No. 420) gives the diameter as 9' and the class as 3 2 p.

Cederblad, S. (1946) [VII/231]

Ced 206 (NGC 7380)

Position (1900): RA 22 43, Dec + 57 21

Star: +57 2615,7 (Mp=8.3, , SpT=B0, A)

Spectrum of nebula: emission spectrum (observed)

Classification: Neb associated with mainly one star (which may be multiple) - star surrounded by a neb envelope with conspicuous structure (eg. IC 5146)

Size: 18'x18'

Notes: "The region of NGC 7380 = GC 4842 = h 2182 = H VIII 77. Disc. 1788. (88 Pl 84, 93 Pl 50, 114, 194, 549, 578, 631, 726 No 21, 753, 821). R. Earlier observers than Reinmuth seem to have perceived only the cluster. Alternative Class: A. 1."

Lynds, B.T. (1965)

Also known as Collinder 452, the cluster is associated with nebulosity; Beverly Lynds (Astrophysical Journal Supplement, No 105, 1965) in her Catalogue of Bright Nebulae notes that this nebula is very bright, more prominent on the red POSS plate and has a maximum size of 25' x 20'.

Sulentic & Tifft (1973)

The RNGC (Sulentic and Tifft 1973) notes that this is a 9.0 mag cluster associated with nebulosity.

Photo index

Photo Index by Jim Lucyk: Vehrenberg's Atlas of Galactic Neb-2 p142.

Lynds, B.T. (1962)

Lynds, B.T. (1962) Catalogue of dark nebulae. Astrophys.J.Suppl.Ser. 7, 1-52. [also: computer datafile: VII/7A]

Modern observations

Ancient City Astron.Club (1980)

Listed by the Herschel Club, described as "very loose and poor with an estimated 50 stars fanning outwards in all directions, very large. 6-inch, 43x."

Walter Scott Houston

Houston notes that small telescopes will reveal a conspicuous double star, mags 7.6 & 8.6, at the southwestern edge.

Tom Lorenzin

Tom Lorenzin, in the e-version of "1000+ The Amateur Astronomers' Field Guide to Deep Sky Observing", notes: "8M; 8' diameter; 20-plus 9M members; surrounding nebulosity visible on great night."

Brian Skiff

Hoag: 30cm pair = ADS16260: V=7.6,8.6; 31"; 117.

15cm - nifty cl nestled in circlet of *s, all about m6-7. 10' diam w/20 *s and unres haze; broad center. BS, 2Jul1971, FtL.

25cm - medium-sized, 10' diam w/40 *s. round and *s uniformly distributed. rich fld. clustering noted ~30' S.

- distinctive V shape pointing N. brtst * on SW as tip of arrow; pairs lie SW and W from this *.

30cm - 149x: 30 *s. m7.5 pair, 20" sep 14' W.

Contemporary observations

Magda Streicher

(no date)

Alldays (22.50S, 20.12E, 770m).

12-inch f/10 SCT (76x, 218x)

NGC 7380, is the only Caroline Herschel object in Cepheus displaying a few bright stars combined with fainter ones and a dainty string flowing in a southerly direction. The cluster is imbedded in nebulosity. A prominent double can be seen on the western periphery of the cluster with a tri-angle shape. Did Caroline ever stare into the night sky, more that 220 years ago, and like me, wished to discuss and share it with someone? A dear English friend of mine once said to be at the telescope all by your self is a very lonely pursuit.

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