sponsored by psychohistorian.org

DOCdb

Deep Sky Observer's Companion – the online database

 

Welcome, guest!

If you've already registered, please log in,

or register an observer profile for added functionality.

List:

log in to manage your observing lists

 browse:

 

 position:

 

 next:

 

 options:

summary

rename

prune

trim

remove

close

copy

combine

plan

bookmark

load

new

delete

marathon

favourite!

Full database:

Entire DOCdb database of 18,816 objects.

 browse:

 position:

NGC 7121 (16,864 of 18,816)

 next:

oc gc pln bn dn gx gxcl ast aka lost

Object:

list

bookmark

finder chart

altitude today

altitude (year)

 search:

½°, , in DOCdb


Warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /home/yivumoo/public_html/show_object.php on line 167

show browsing

NGC 7121

NGC 7121, LEDA 67287, MCG-01-55-008, GC 6009

RA: 21h 44m 52.52s
Dec: −03° 37′ 12.1″

Con: Aquarius
Ch: MSA:1309, U2:256, SA:17

Ref: SIMBAD

(reference key)

Type: galaxy

Mag: B=14, V=?

Size: 1.148′ x 0.602′
PA: 165°

Published comments

Sulentic & Tifft (1973)

The RNGC (Sulentic and Tifft 1973) notes that this is a 14.0 mag galaxy. Their coded description reads S,INC,BM,SLDIF,PD.

Modern observations

[amastro] N7121 in Aquarius

NGC 7121 Aquarius 21h 44m 51.3sec -03 37' 33"

I tried to observe this last Friday night, but clouds moved in before I could do so. Has anyone ever seen it? The reason I ask is it in not shown on the Millennium Atlas (it should be on page 1309). It is shown on page 256 of Uranometria, however. The DSS plates surely show a galaxy there. How does it look in your scope?

I reviewed all most notes from the years observing and I don't see that I've ever observed it before.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Well, I saw it, and from my notes it is not very remarkable...

#5339 11/15/98 SCOPE 17.5 ALTAZ 5 7 SONOITA

13N (153x) Elongated 1.5 to 1, a soft oval a little brighter to the middle. Pointed to by and 11.3 and 12.5 pair 1.5' E. A small group of brighter stars lies W.

-Jay-

Visit my website at: http://www.dakotacom.net/~jaleblan/index.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Should be easy in your scope, Kent. This observation is from August '91 -- let us know if you see any interesting details.

17.5": faint, fairly small, elongated 2:1 N-S, 1.5'x0.75', weak concentration. A mag 11.5 star is 1.5' ESE of center.

Steve Gottlieb

NGC/IC Project Adventures in Deep Space

http://www.ngcic.org/ http://www.angelfire.com/id/jsredshift/

------------------------------------------------------------------------

NGC 7121 has total B magnitude 14.3 according to NED, which is a bit below the MSA cutoff, whereas U2000 simply plots all NGC objects.

Bigourdan observed it four times with the 30cm refractor at the Paris Observatory a hundred years ago:

1887 Aout 24 -- Neb. diffuse, arrondie, un peu plus brillante dans la region centrale, ou se trouve une condensation assez stellaire et tres faible.

1889 Aout 28 -- La nebuleuse est aujourd'hui t(res) faible.

1889 Septembre 18 -- Nebuleuse a. diffuse, arrondie, t(res) legerement plus brillante dans la region central, sans condensation bien prononcee.

1895 Oct 17 -- Neb. difficile a voir a cause du voisinage de l'* de comparison. Elle parait de grandeur 13.3-13.4 de forme et d'etendue insaisissables, arrondie, d'environ 30" de diametre, plus brillante au centre, avec condensation stellaire qui assez bien.

Bigourdan specifies using 159x for these observations.

There are enough cognates here to get the picture even if your French is (like mine) lousy, as long as you don't trip over "insaissisable"... in-say-cease-ah-bl. Since Yann Pothier is on the list, if anyone wants a complete translation, perhaps he can provide one.

For those that aren't familiar with him, Bigourdan was mainly a double-star observer, but also did solar work, and was the librarian at the Paris Observatory around the turn of the last century. He also made visual micrometric observations and verbal descriptions of all the NGC objects visible from Paris and accessible with the 30cm refractor, contributing many IC objects in the process. These results are published in six fat volumes that we're lucky enough to have in the Lowell library.

\Brian

Favourite lists

Lacaille's catalogue

The Messier objects

Dunlop's catalogue

The Bennett objects

The Caldwell list

Named DSOs

Object search

First search phrase

    and

Second search phrase

Type of object to include:

open cluster
globular cluster
planetary nebula
bright nebula
dark nebula
galaxy
galaxy cluster
asterism & stars
unverified/lost
nova

The Bug Report

DOCdb is still in beta-release.

Known issues, feature requests, and updates on bug fixes, are here:

> Bug Report

Feedback

Found a bug? Have a comment or suggestion to improve DOCdb? Please let us know!

> Contact us

Help!

DOCdb is a free online resource that exists to promote deep sky observing.

You could help by sharing your observations, writing an article, digitizing and proof-reading historical material, and more.

> Find out more

Everything on DOCdb.net is © 2004-2010 by Auke Slotegraaf, unless stated otherwise or if you can prove you have divine permission to use it. Before using material published here, please consult the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.5 License. Some material on DOCdb is copyright the individual authors. If in doubt, don't reproduce. And that goes for having children, too. Please note that the recommended browser for DOCdb is Firefox 3.x. You may also get good results with K-Meleon. Good luck if you're using IE. A successful experience with other browsers, including Opera and Safari, may vary.