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NGC 2467 (4,892 of 18,816)

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NGC 2467

NGC 2467, Ced 103, C 0750-263, Cl Collinder 164, OCISM 128, Ocl 668.0, Bennett 37a, IV 22, h 472, GC 1589

RA: 07h 52m 19.3s
Dec: −26° 26′ 30″

Con: Puppis
Ch: MSA:343, U2:320, SA:19

Ref: SIMBAD, Collinder (1931), DAML02, Archinal&Hynes (2003)

(reference key)

Type: star cluster, 13mn

Mag: B=?, V=7.1

Size: 14′
PA: ?

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Sketches  (1)

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Photos  (4)

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Remarks

Collinder 164 is a moderately rich open cluster associated with the curious nebulosity NGC 2467. The cluster consists of 50 faint and bright stars with an integrated magnitude of 7.0, spread out over 15 arc minutes of sky.

Historical observations

William Herschel (c.1784)

Synonyms: H IV-022

This curious nebulosity was discovered by William Herschel in 1784. Using an 18.7-inch f/13 speculum telescope, he called it "L, pB, R, easily resolvable, 6 or 7' diameter, a faint red colour visible. A star 8mag not far from the center, but not connected. By second observation, 9 or 10' diameter."

NGC/IC Dreyer (1888, 1895, 1908)

The NGC description reads: "pretty bright, very large, round, easily resolvable, 8th mag star in the middle."

Published comments

Helwan Obs. Bulletin No 15 (1915)

pF, 5'x5', structureless.

Cederblad, S. (1946) [VII/231]

Ced 103 (NGC 2467)

Position (1900): RA 7 48.3, Dec - 26 8

Star: -26 2115 (Mp=8.9:, V=8.5:, SpT=B)

Spectrum of nebula: (not classified)

Classification: Nebulous cluster (Patches of neb adhering to individual stars of the cluster, eg. Pleiades)

Size: 4.5'x4.5'

Notes: "NGC 2467 = GC 1589 = h 472 = H IV 22. Disc. 1784. FA 52. (114, 194). R. Nebulous cluster. On FA 52, and according to (114), the nebulosity is confined to the vicinity of -26 5115 = HD 64315. The principal star of the cluster is -26 5137 = HD 64455."

Lynds, B.T. (1962)

Lynds, B.T. (1962) Catalogue of dark nebulae. Astrophys.J.Suppl.Ser. 7, 1-52. [also: computer datafile: VII/7A]

Gum, C.S. (1955)

Gum, C.S. (1955) A survey of southern HII regions. Mem.RAS, 67. [1955MmRAS..67..155G]

Also known as Minkowski II-8, Colin Gum included it in his catalog of southern HII regions as number 9. He notes that the object is distinctly separated from the background Milky Way in which it lies, and measures 10' x 5' on photographs he took of it. He placed it in Class II of his classification system of nebulae, which contains objects "irregular in shape with associated dark matter..." Gum notes that the object has a faint "tail" about 30' long with the exciting star (HD 64315) in the bright "head". In the 1960 RCW catalog, the authors include it as RCW 16, call it "bright", and give its dimensions as 33' by 33'. They describe it as a "circular region." Lynds notes that the nebula is more prominent on the red Palomar plate, on which it measures 8' x 7'. It is possibly part of the Puppis OB1 association. The cluster associated with the nebula is Collinder 164.

Sulentic & Tifft (1973)

The RNGC (Sulentic and Tifft 1973) notes that this is a 7.0 mag cluster associated with nebulosity.

Burnham's Celestial Handbook

Burnham says in small telescopes the object appears as a hazy glow some 4' across, surrounding an 8th magnitude B-type star. The star mentioned in both descriptions is HD 64315 with a photographic magnitude of 8.9.

Photo index

by Jim Lucyk: Sky&Tel. 8/76 p106, Vehrenberg's Atlas of DS Splendors (3ed) p89, Vehrenberg's Atlas of Galactic Neb-1 p124.

ESO press release HEIC 1012 (2010)

"Hubble snaps sharp image of cosmic cauldron NGC 2467".

Modern observations

Graham Long

Subject: [deepsky] Observation of Sh2-311

From: Graham Long [glong@eis.net.au]

G'day,

The description of the cluster is " Mag 7.1 open cluster in star rich field. Not itself all that impressive and consists mainly of a haze of uniformly faint stars". This comes from the same article in the ASV newsletter which is not online.

My opportunity to see it comes from the practice of some Australian societies of exchanging newsletters.

cheers

Graham

---------------

At 17:57 16/02/99 +0200, you wrote:

] From: Auke Slotegraaf [auke@global.co.za]

]

] Hi Graham

] Thanks for the interesting report -- I was wondering if you perhaps noted a description for the open cluster (Collinder 164) itself?

] [ Interestingly, John Herschel didn't record NGC 2467 while at the Cape (at least as far as I know). It certainly is far enough south (-26 declination).]

] By the way, the article you mention in the ASV newsletter -- is that perhaps available online somewhere?

] P.S. For those on the list who may be working on their Bennett Certificates, this one is a.k.a. Bennett 37a -- so send in those observations!

] Regards,

] Auke

Steve Coe

Steve Coe, in SACNEWS On-Line for February 1996, writes: "NGC 2467 is bright, pretty large, pretty rich, 31 stars counted at 100X. This cluster was easy in the 11X80 finder. The star cluster is very nice and would generate observers if it were alone, but there is some bright nebulosity associated with this cluster. The nebula was seen without the UHC filter to start, but adding the filter made the nebula much better. There is a bright, round spot of nebulosity on the southwest side of the cluster and several pretty bright streaks on the northeast sections. Covering my head with a dark cloth and using the UHC filter, I could see that the entire field of view was nebulous to some degree. To top is off, there are several dark lanes winding there way through this region. Take a look at this little known cluster with nebulosity at 7 hr 52.6 min and -26 23."

Cozens, Glen

Glen Cozens notes that it is "a good example of a small, bright diffuse nebula."

Clarke, W.P. (1992)

William P. Clarke (San Diego, California, USA) writes in The Webb Society Nebulae and Clusters Section Report No. 10, July 1992: "A round glow with a bright star near the centre and a dark lane running east-west through the northern section. A broad, faint extension runs ENE. Many faint stars within the field, even with an O III filter in place. (21-inch f/20, x140)."

AJ Crayon

AJ Crayon, using an 8" f/6 Newtonian, notes: "is a cluster with nebulosity. This large open cluster is not well defined in the 8" telescope. It appears to be 5' with 20 stars from 11m to 13m limit of the telescope, at 100x. There is an isoceles triangle of 8m stars that frames a glow of unresolved stars. The nebula Sharpless 311 is 10' southwest of the triangle of stars. In short I don't see a large open cluster here!"

Steve Coe

Steve Coe, observing with a 13" f/5.6, notes: "Bright, pretty large, pretty rich, 31 stars counted at 100X. This cluster was easy in the 11X80 finder. The star cluster is very nice and would generate observers if it where alone, but there is some bright nebulosity associated with this cluster. The nebula was seen without the UHC filter to start, but adding the filter made the nebula much better. There is a bright, round spot of nebulosity on the southwest side of the cluster and several pretty bright streaks on the northeast sections. Covering my head with a dark cloth and using the UHC filter, I could see that the entire field of view was nebulous to some degree. To top is off, there are several dark lanes winding there way through this region. Take a look at this little known cluster and nebula."

-------------------

Observer: Steve Coe Your skills: Advanced (many years) Date/time of observation: 16 April 1999 Location of site: Sentinel Star Gaze, AZ (Lat 45 n, Elev 100m) Site classification: Rural Sky darkness: 8 (1-10, 10 best) Seeing: 7 (1-10, 10 best) Moon presence: None - moon not in sky Instrument: 13" f/5.6 Newt Magnification: Filter(s): None. Object(s): NGC 2467 Category: Emission nebula. Class: E Constellation: Pup Data: mag 9.2m*; size 8x7 Position: 075220.8 -262628 Description: Sentinel Star Gaze 99 - Big Success

As I put the 13 incher on NGC 2467, a nebula in Puppis, I realize that it is a special night. The seeing is excellent and I am using 220X on an object that has a Declination of -26 degrees! Realizing that the sky is clear and steady even a small distance above the southern horizon, I spend some time on 2467 and see lots of fine detail with the round, pretty faint nebula. There are several, thin, dark lanes within the nebulosity and 9 stars involved. At this point I decide to rate the seeing as a 7/10 and the transparency at 8/10, as good as Sentinel gets. [Yet more to come!]

Tom Lorenzin

Tom Lorenzin, in the electronic version of "1000+ The Amateur Astronomers' Field Guide to Deep Sky Observing", notes: "7.1M; 4' diameter; soft and round; faint streamers radiating; associated with cluster Haffner-18 (1' diameter; 15-plus 9 thru 12M members); 1.5 degrees to SW lies cluster N2453 (8M; 5' diameter; 25-plus 10M and dimmer members) with associated planetary N2452 (12.6M; 19" diameter) in SW portion of cluster; use N-filter at >200x."

Long, Graham [deepsky]

Subject: [deepsky] Observation of Sh2-311

From: Graham Long (glong@eis.net.au)

G'day,

Inspired by an article in the newsletter of the Astronomical Society of Victoria on deepsky objects in Puppis, I viewed SH2-311 on the weekend at a site about 80km north west of Brisbane.

This bright nebula is superimposed on open cluster NGC2467. Some references including Hartung's call the nebulea NGC2467.

With a C14, 40mm 2" televue and an O111 filter, it is quite a sight filling the eyepiece.

The brightest portion of the nebulea is circular around one of the brighter stars in the cluster and on a night with just average transparency, two other branches were just visible with averted vision. One was to the south east and picked up a number of fainter stars while an even fainter one led to the west.

Cheers; Graham Long; South East Queensland Astronomical Society.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

(unknown) [s.a.a. posting, 1998]

From: davidc2@mediaone.net (DC)

Subject: NGC 2467 and SH 2-311

Date: Thu, 26 Mar 1998 11:40:38 GMT

While out obsering the Herschel II objects on Monday night I came across a spectacular object. I was going down my list of objects to look at and NGC 2467 was up next. The manual described it as an open cluster and was associated with the bright nebula SH 2-311. I found the cluster without any problems and then noticed a huge ball of light just west of the nebula. I popped on O-III filter in it and saw this nebula come to life!!! Sh 2-311 is huge. To me it resembles the Owl nebula but twice as big!!! If you have a chance to look at this object, do so, you will not be disappointed. ... I was using a 12.5 Meade and my observing partner was using a 10 inch Dob. This nebula is simply on my top 10 nebulas!!!

Contemporary observations

Magda Streicher

1998 January 25

Location: Pietersburg (South 23 53. East 29 28).

Sky conditions: Good.

Instrument: Meade 12 inch (Eyepiece 40mm).

Date: 25 January 1998.

Field of view: 52.7 arc minutes.

Roundish, remarkable gaseous even glow, very large and bright with a prominent star about 7 to 8 magnitude embedded just off center in this nebula. To the northwest a few faint stars group together, looking hazier towards the south. Many faint stars in the field.

(no date)

12-inch f/10 SCT (EP: 2-inch 32mm SW 95x 42' fov; 2-inch 14mm UW 218x 23' fov)

Roundish, remarkable gaseous even glow, very large and bright that surrounds a 7.9 magnitude star, embedded east off centre in this nebula (218x). Fainter stars can be seen dotted the northwest section. The whole field of view is surrounded in nebulosity and dark patches can be discerned. Extension patches can be seen more so towards the north in the field of view (95x). Lovely nebula and star cluster in one, with many faint stars dotted the field of view.

Tom Bryant

2007-03-18 10:30:00

Observing site: Pinnacles overlook

Telescope: C-8

[7h 52m 36s, -26 23' 0"] Looks like a large, faint planetary. Probably a stromgen sphere. In a rather starry field. Quite nice.

Richard Ford

2015, February, 22nd

Location:Perdeberg.

Time:11:48pm.

Sky Conditions:The fainter parts of the Milky Way are barely visible.Haziness only visible on the horizon.Atmosphere stable with little interference.

Instrument:12-inch Dobsonian.

This emission nebula has an oval-like shape which contains a small open cluster of stars ranging from magnitude 10 to 12.Around the outskirts of this nebula there are plenty of areas of uneven brightness being seen.This nebula measures 5.7'x 4.7'.Chart No.353,NSOG Vol.1.

2012 March 24th, Sat

Location:Perdeberg.

Time:10:42pm.

Sky Conditions:The fainter parts of the Milky Way are barely visible.Haziness only visible on the horizon.Atmosphere stable with little interference.

Instrument:12-inch Dobsonian.

This nebula surrounding this open cluster is well observed as a small bright circular cloud of gas and dust whereby an 11th magnitude star is seen in the center of this nebula.This open cluster measures 8.2'*4.1'.This nebula's light is brighter in the center compared to the light of this nebula on the outside.

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